Experience With Children Cover Letter

Nanny Cover Letter Sample 1: 

I am writing to submit my resume for the after school nanny position for your three children, Samantha, John, and Emily. I read the advertisement you posted on nanniesforhire.com with great excitement, and believe I would be the perfect fit for your family.

As a nanny, I have years of experience caring for children of all ages, from infants to preteens. In my previous role as daytime nanny to a busy family of five children, I learned how difficult it can be to manage the varying needs of children in diverse stages of development. I honed the ability to care for each child individually, while paying close attention to the needs of the group.

I am committed to providing a safe, nurturing environment for the children in my care. As a camp counselor for three summers at a camp for underprivileged children, I provided weekly music lessons geared towards children in the 7 – 10 age group. Hearing children make music together is a uniquely rewarding experience I’ll always remember.

You mentioned in your advertisement that you’re particularly interested in a nanny who can help improve your children’s ability to speak French. Having spent a semester abroad in Provence during my junior year of college, I am a fluent speaker of French, and would be more than happy to help increase your children’s proficiency in the language.

I take safety extremely seriously, and am trained and certified in childhood first-aid and CPR. I am also a long-standing member of the National American Association of Child Care Providers, and participate frequently in training seminars on the newest developments in the field of child care.

I would love to speak with you personally about your family’s needs. Please don’t hesitate to contact me by phone or by email. Thank you so much for the opportunity to be considered for the position, and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Nanny Cover Letter Sample 2: 

I understand that you are looking for a nanny for your three children aged 9 years, 6 years, and 5 months. Ms. Kindell, who was your children’s nanny some years back, informed me about your requirement and believes I have the qualification and qualities to meet your expectations.

As you can see from my resume, attached with this application, I have had more than 8 years of experience in caring for young children. My current job involves taking care of a 7 month baby of Mr. and Mrs. Reed, residents of Park Avenue St whose number I can provide if needed.

Taking care of young children, especially babies, is rewarding but sometimes challenging. Over the years, I have developed special techniques that prove useful in calming young babies, including the most restless ones. I am in favor of a structured day as it gives children an opportunity to follow a schedule and to learn and understand discipline.

All my employers, including my present employer, have been happy with my work and have often complemented me on my expertise in taking care of young children. I completed a CPR and First Aid training before I took my first job as nanny and have since then kept my certifications up to date. I believe such knowledge is important for a nanny and can be a life saver in case of an injury or accident.

I am looking for a position for nanny that also provides me a place to live. My 8 years of experience in this field and education, I feel make me a good candidate for the position. I do not mind doing household chores that do not correlate to the care of children. I have a friendly and pleasing demeanor and enjoy working with others.

Nanny Cover Letter Sample 3: 

I am writing to express my interest in the position of Nanny, an advertisement concerning which was posted in the local newspaper. I understand from your ad you are looking for an experienced, qualified, and caring nanny for your two young children, a boy of 9 and a girl of 5. I meet all your listed requirements and believe would make a good nanny for your 2 children.

As my attached resume shows, I have 6 years of experience as a nanny for two families. Besides my application and resume, I am attaching letters of recommendation from both my employers, who have complemented me for my responsible, mature, and professional way of caring for their young children.

In addition to two full-time nanny positions, I have worked as a part-time babysitter for several families during my high school days. This experience and the fact that I had three younger siblings to care and cook for have helped me develop exceptional child caring skills.

I love children and enjoy their company immensely and find nothing is more rewarding than taking care of them. I believe in creating a positive, happy environment for children, one in which they feel protected and can thrive. I have good organizational and communication skills, which I believe are among the most important skills for a nanny.

I don’t mind doing extra duties for you, like cleaning and cooking dinner for the entire family. I work well with other people, thanks to my friendly and caring nature, and am sure I will make a good team with your other household employees.

I am deeply interested in working for you, and hope you will give me a chance to meet you in person to discuss my candidacy in detail.

I’ve read a lot of cover letters throughout my career. When I was a fellowship program manager, I reviewed them in consideration for more than 60 open positions each year. So I saw it all–the good, the bad, and the standout examples that I can still remember.

As a result, I’ve become the go-to friend when people need feedback on their job applications. Based on my own experience putting people in the “yes” (and “no”) pile, I’m able to give these cover letters a quick scan and immediately identify what’ll turn a hiring manager off.

While I can’t give you insight into every person’s head who’ll be reading your materials, I can share with you the feedback that I give my own loved ones.

1. The Basics

First things first, I skim the document for anything that could be disqualifying. That includes typos, a “Dear Sir or Madam” or “To Whom It May Concern” salutation, or a vibe so non-specific that it reeks of find-replace. I know it seems harsh, but when a hiring manager sees any one of these things, she reads it as, “I didn’t take my time with this, and I don’t really care about working here.” So she’s likely to pass.

Another thing I look for in this initial read-through is tone. Even if you’re applying to your dream company, you don’t want to come off like you think someone entertaining your candidacy is the same as him offering you water at the end of a lengthy hike. You don’t need to thank the hiring manager so incredibly much for reading your application–that’s his job. If you align considering your application with the biggest favor ever, you’ll make the other person think it’s because you’re desperate.

So, skip effusive thanks and demonstrate genuine interest by writing a cover letter that connects the dots between your experience and the requirements of the position. Telling the reader what you’ve accomplished and how it directly translates to meeting the company’s needs is always a better use of space than gushing.

2. The Opening Sentence

If your first line reads: “I am writing to apply for [job] at [company],” I will delete it and suggest a swap every time. (Yes, every single time.) When a hiring manager sees that, she won’t think, “How thoughtful of the applicant to remind me what I’m reading!” Her reaction will be much closer to, “boring,” “meh,” or even “next!”

Compare it to one of these statements:

I’ve wanted to work in education ever since my third-grade teacher, Mrs. Dorchester, helped me discover a love of reading.

My approach to management is simple: I strive to be the kind of leader I’d want to work for.

In my three years at [prior company], I increased our average quarterly sales by [percentage].

See how these examples make you want to keep reading? That’s half the battle right there. Additionally, it makes you memorable, which’ll help when you’re competing against a sea of applicants.

To try it out for yourself, pick a jumping-off point. It could be something about you or an aspect of the job description that you’re really drawn to. Then, open a blank document and just free-write (translation: write whatever comes to mind) for 10 minutes. Some of the sentences you come up with will sound embarrassing or lame: That’s fine–no one has to see those! Look for the sentence that’s most engaging and see how it reads as the opening line for your cover letter.

3. The Examples

Most often, people send me just their cover letter and resume, so I don’t have the benefit of reviewing the position description. And yet, whenever a letter follows the format of “I am skilled at [skill], [skill], [skill], as evidenced by my time at [place].” Or “You’re looking for [skill], and I am a talented [skill], ” I could pretty much re-create it. Surprise: that’s actually not a good thing.

Again, the goal isn’t just to show you’re qualified: It’s to make the case that you’re more qualified than all the other applicants. You want to make clear what distinguishes you, so the hiring manager can see why you’re worth following up with to learn more. And–again–you want to be memorable.

If you write a laundry list, it’ll blend into every other submission formatted the same way. So, just like you went with a unique opener, do the same with your examples. Sure, you might still include lists of skills, but break those up with anecdotes or splashes of personality.

Here’s a real, two-line excerpt from a cover letter I’ve written before:

If I’m in a conference room and the video isn’t working, I’m not the sort to simply call IT and wait. I’ll also (gracefully) crawl under the table, and check that everything is properly plugged in.

A couple lines like this will not only lighten up your letter, but also highlight your soft skills. I got the point across that I’m a take-charge problem solver, without saying, “I’m a take-charge problem solver.” Plus the “(gracefully)” shows that I don’t take myself too seriously–even in a job application. If your submission follows the same list-type format all the way through, see if you can’t pepper in an example or anecdote that’ll add some personality.

You want your cover letter to stand out for all the right reasons. So, before you click submit, take a few minutes to make sure you’re putting your best (and most memorable) foot forward.

Related Video: This Is What People Really Think Of Your Resumé


This article originally appeared on The Daily Muse and is reprinted with permission.

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