Critical Thinking In Business Schoenberg Germany

532 Anderson Hall
215-204-1760
www.cla.temple.edu/fgis

Cristina Gragnani, Chair
550 Anderson Hall
215-204-1816
gragnani@temple.edu

Anthony Waskie, Faculty Advisor
513 Anderson Hall
215-204–5452
awaskie@temple.edu

Patricia Melzer, Faculty Advisor
527 Anderson Hall
215-204–8259
pmelzer@temple.edu

Michelle Pugliese, Administrator
429 Anderson Hall
215-204-5628
pugliese@temple.edu

Stephanie Smith, Coordinator
539 Anderson Hall
215-204-1261
ssmith14@temple.edu

German is a major world language spoken in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, as well as in some communities in the United States. Whether you are interested in literature, music, theater, film, or art, German culture is a rich and exciting tradition. Temple's German program provides broad linguistic, cultural, and practical experiences to prepare students to participate meaningfully in the German-speaking world.

The German major and minor help students achieve their learning goals, whether they want to go on to use German to communicate with friends in Germany, Austria, or Switzerland; to engage in business with German partners; to work in government or in the media; or to participate in German culture. They develop skills in reading, writing, and oral communication while acquiring a rich understanding of the literature, cinema, history and culture of the German-speaking world.

Students who study German at Temple find that the program prepares them to do well in whatever they choose upon graduation; the German major is a good preparation for a career that requires analytical thinking and communication skills in general, which includes the domains of education, business, government service, travel, and tourism. It is a good major or second major for students planning to attend law school or medical school. Studies have shown that learning a foreign language helps raise scores on the LSAT, GRE, and MCAT examinations. This course of study also proves valuable to anyone who plans to work for a multinational corporation.

The German courses are often small, allowing students to get to know one another and their professors well. The program helps prepare students enrolled in the Fox School of Business and Management to acquire a special language certificate including a special course on German in the business world. Outside of class, students can share conversations and activities informally or with the Temple University German Society.

Study Abroad

Students declaring a major or minor in the department are strongly encouraged to study abroad. Temple University has programs at the universities of Hamburg, Tübingen, and Leipzig in Germany. Courses completed in these programs may be credited toward the German major or minor and in partial satisfaction of the CLA Global Studies requirement.

Students interested in Study Abroad should discuss their plans with the faculty advisor in German early in their academic program. 

Courses

GER 0868. World Society in Literature & Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about a particular national culture - Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course - by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don't need to speak Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, Asian Studies 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0868/0968, French 0868/0968, German 0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0868/0968, Jewish Studies 0868, Korean 0868, LAS 0868/0968, Political Science 0868/0968, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0868/0968.

Course Attributes: GG

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GER 0968. Honors World Society in Literature & Film. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn about a particular national culture - Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course - by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don't need to speak Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, Asian Studies 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0868/0968, French 0868/0968, German 0868, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0868/0968, Jewish Studies 0868, Korean 0868, LAS 0868/0968, Political Science 0868/0968, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0868/0968.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GG, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GER 1001. Introduction to German I. 4 Credit Hours.

Classroom work devoted to understanding and speaking German and the reading of graded texts. Laboratory and videotape work stress pronunciation, aural, and oral drills based on an elementary workbook, aimed at communication.

Course Attributes: LA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GER 1002. Introduction to German II. 4 Credit Hours.

Emphasis on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German. Laboratory and videotapes stress communication skills.

Course Attributes: LA

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 1001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE C1002|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE B1002|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE C1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE B1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 1003. Introduction to German III. 3 Credit Hours.

Review of grammar. Reading and discussion of texts of intermediate difficulty.

Course Attributes: LB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 1002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE C1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE B1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 1941. Honors Literature and Culture of Central Europe in the 20th Century. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the principal issues, ideas, and genres in the literature of Central Europe since 1900. Through the study of literature, cinema, and the artistic avant-garde, it explores a unique cultural history. Readings include works from Austrian, Croatian, Czech, Hungarian, and Serbian fiction. Course materials will also include the screening of feature films from the region. NOTE: (1) Offered in English. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO, IS

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GER 2001. Intermediate. 3 Credit Hours.

Continued refinement of grammar. Reading and discussion of textbook and newspaper articles. Increasing vocabulary and practice of basic writing skills.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 2011. Immersion in German. 1 to 3 Credit Hour.

A one-credit course for students who participate in our Summer Intensive German Program in Leipzig after the German II [German 1002 (0052)] level in order to reward the extra time and exposure they receive during the program.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
GER 1002|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE C1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE B1003|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 2041. Reading I. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on developing reading strategies for the advanced intermediate student. Through theory and practice using a broad range of documents, this course provides a bridge from foundation courses to those dealing with more sophisticated primary texts.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 2122. Conversation I. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of German language with intensive work in skills required for understanding and speaking. Stress on pronunciation, practical vocabulary, idioms, and useful sentence structures. At the end of the course, students should be able to converse at the Intermediate Mid level (ACTFL Rating Scale).

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 2131. The Contemporary German-Speaking World. 3 Credit Hours.

This course concentrates on familiarizing the student with the German-speaking countries: Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. Students explore contemporary history, geography, provinces, products, industries, customs, and cuisine of these countries. Use of the computer facilitates mapmaking, visualizing famous people and places, and accessing immediate events. Communication will be in German on such topics as contemporary politics, the environment, history, film, music, art, literature, and technology--and will improve reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills at the same time.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 2141. Hesse, Kafka, Mann, and Rilke. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the literary giants of modern German literature. A reading knowledge in German is required since all primary and most secondary texts will be in German, although English translation of the texts may also be used. Course readings will focus on selected stories and novels by Franz Kafka; Rainer Maria Rilke; and Nobel Prize winners Hermann Hesse and Thomas Mann.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GER 2501. German for Business I. 3 Credit Hours.

German for Business is an advanced language course for students who wish to continue their study of German while focusing on current issues in economics and business in the German-speaking countries of Europe. The goal of the course is to advance communication and comprehension skills and to introduce the specialized vocabulary of business. Some of the topics include: German unification, the European Union, transportation and infrastructure, labor unions, the major industries and companies in Germany, taxes, workers' benefits, banking and environmental policy, travel industry, and office procedures.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 3011. Intensive German in Germany. 3 Credit Hours.

A course intended for German Language students who are enrolled to study abroad in a German-speaking country for a semester of the year, and need to obtain credit for courses taken at that German University.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GER 3021. Conversation II. 3 Credit Hours.

This second level course is designed to build on skills in German oral expression acquired in German Conversation I through special focus on expanding vocabulary and idiomatic fluency, honing listening skills, improving pronunciation and awareness of different linguistic registers, and increasing the ease of oral expression through frequent practice.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 2122|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 3096. Composition I. 3 Credit Hours.

Improvement in using the language through intensive written practice, grammar review, and study of problems in syntax and style. Use of current materials from German-speaking countries. NOTE: Capstone writing course. Required for major, minor, and language certificate in German.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 3101. Introduction to German Literature I. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an introduction to German literature through analysis and discussion of selected texts within the context of German literary and cultural history. The course provides an overview of significant periods, authors, genres, and topics in German literature from the earliest periods, Old High German through Middle High German to Early Modern German of the Renaissance. The course is taught in German with discussion, reading and writing components. Students are encouraged to formulate their interpretations of literary texts both orally and in written form. The course provides ample opportunity for students to strengthen their speaking and writing skills in the German language. NOTE: Conducted in German.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 3102. Introduction to German Literature II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a continuation of the introduction to German literature through analysis and discussion of selected texts within the context of German literary and cultural history. The course provides an overview of significant periods, authors, genres, and topics in German literature from the "Baroque" period through the Golden Ages of the 18th and 19th centuries to Modern German Literature. The course is taught in German with discussion, reading and writing components. Students are encouraged to formulate their interpretations of literary texts both orally and in written form. The course provides ample opportunity for students to strengthen their speaking and writing skills in the German language. It is recommended that the courses be scheduled in succession.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 3182. Independent Study I. 3 Credit Hours.

Supervised study of a topic area agreed upon by the student and instructor.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

GER 3201. Culture and Civilization I. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the German-speaking peoples through the broad spectrum of their culture, history, art and literature; explore the great events and personalities who contributed to German Culture, from the Romans and earliest records of the Germanic tribes up to the Renaissance and Reformation; and continue efforts to understand, speak, read and write German with increasing proficiency and facility. NOTE: Required for major, minor, and language certificate in German.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 2122|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 3202. Culture and Civilization II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course continues the examination of the German-speaking peoples through the broad spectrum of their culture, history, art and literature; explores the great events and personalities who contributed to German Culture, from the religious wars of the 17th Century and Baroque period up to Post-War modern Germany; and continues efforts to understand, speak, read and write German with increasing proficiency and facility.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 2122|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 3221. German Culture through Film. 3 Credit Hours.

The course examines German cinema in the context of its relationship to German culture and history. Because film is an art form of creative expression as well as a vehicle for promoting awareness of social concerns, the course will introduce techniques of viewing, analyzing, and evaluating films as expressions of the contemporary culture. Basing our work on films of historical significance and those by premier directors, the course will explore the beginnings of the film industry, Nazi propaganda, the impact of the Obernhausen Manifesto, New German Films, and issues of gender and politics since the Wende.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GER 3275. Fin-de-Siecle Vienna: Birthplace of Modernity around 1900. 3 Credit Hours.

An interdisciplinary approach to the cultural and political transformations taking place in Vienna around 1900 (art, architecture, literature, psychoanalysis, music). The common contexts and interconnections between writers such as Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal, Altenberg, and Kraus, Freud's psychoanalysis, Klimt and Schiele's "Jugendstil," the architectural innovations of Wagner, Loos and the Ringstrasse, and the music of Mahler, R. Strauss, and Schoenberg. Focus on issues such as sexuality, disease, desire, and modernity. The rise of mass politics and modern anti-Semitism will also be discussed.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GER 3282. Independent Study II. 3 Credit Hours.

The theme for this course will be decided by the Core-Coordinators based on the needs and interests of the students enrolled. The course is intended for German majors/minors.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
GER 2001|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 3363. Diabolical Dilemmas: The Faust Theme in German Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

What is meant by the term "Faustian"? Since ancient times, western societies have fostered the idea that one should strive constantly to achieve all that is in one's power. At the same time, we have been careful to set ethical and cultural limits and punish those who have overstepped these boundaries. Focusing on tracing the development and permutations of the themes of the Faust legend in Germany over the past 200 years, this course investigates literary treatments of such transgressors in German literature and film, and compares them to actual situations presenting ethical dilemmas. NOTE: (1) The course is conducted in German. (2) In Fall 2010, this course will focus on historical, literary, and philosophical aspects of the concept Faustian through literary works including Goethe's Faust, Duerrenmatt's Physicists, and Thomas Mann's Mario and the Magician, as well as representations in art, music, and film. Discussion, reports, periodic examinations.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 3102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 4140. Seminar in Special Topic. 3 Credit Hours.

Topic varies each semester. NOTE: Offered in English.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

GER 4141. German Expressionism. 3 Credit Hours.

German Expressionism (ca. 1910-1920) is certainly one of the most innovative artistic movements in the history of German culture; it is certainly the most revolutionary. The course will trace the development of Expressionism in the arts with the major emphasis on literature. Authors such as Kafka, Trakl, Wedekind, and Werfel, will be read. The course also focuses on the beginnings of German cinema as seen in the works of F. Lang, E. Lubitsch, and F. Murnau. The rich art production of Beckmann, Kandinsky, Marc, and others will add to our understanding of the revolutionary nature of German Expressionism. This course is conducted in German.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 3102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 4142. Novelle. 3 Credit Hours.

By reading, discussing, and writing about novellas recognized as significant representative works of the genre, the course aims to provide students with tools to: locate the novella's place in German literature within cultural settings; become acquainted with research into the genre; and practice, refresh and expand all language skills, especially reading, writing, and vocabulary development skills. All of the selected texts share thematic aspects of the supernatural or surreal as integral to development of the hallmark novella twist of plot. NOTE: The course is conducted in German.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 3102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 4144. The Golden Age: Goethe and Schiller. 3 Credit Hours.

The course provides an introduction to the literary and philosophical developments of the classical period in German literature through an intensive reading and analysis of the prose, plays, and poems of Goethe and Schiller. The examination of this critical period in German literature/culture will be carried out by also scrutinizing representative works from the Storm and Stress period, as well as Early Romanticism. NOTE: The course is conducted in German.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 3102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 4145. Twentieth Century Drama: From Expressionism to the Absurd and Beyond. 3 Credit Hours.

A selection of representative German theatrical works from Expressionism to the present (Hauptmann, Hofmannsthal, Brecht, Goering, Kaiser, Duerrenmatt, Frisch, Peter Weiss, Handke, Turrini), focusing on historical and cultural contexts as well as literary and linguistic analysis. Discussion, reports, and videos. NOTE: The course is conducted in German.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 3102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 4146. Twentieth Century Prose: Searching for Identity. 3 Credit Hours.

In various types of writing - novel, novelle, short story, epistolary literature - German-speaking poets of the past century revealed a continuing, but not necessarily satisfying, search for identity. This course aims to trace that trajectory by studying representative works from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Readings include works by Thomas Mann, Hesse, Kafka, Seghers, Brussig, Borchert, Boell, Heym, Grass, Oezdamar, and Werfel. Discussion, videos, oral and written reports. NOTE: The course is conducted in German.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 3102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 4147. Kafka. 3 Credit Hours.

Franz Kafka is justly regarded as one of the seminal writers of the 20th century. The simplicity of his language, combined with fantasy-based situations, produces texts with surprising twists, dark humor, and great spiritual depth. They capture the deliberations of a man both fascinated and imprisoned by language and life. Issues of freedom/restrictions and imprisonment/liberation are central to Kafka's writings. Works to be read are: Amerika, Der Prozess, Gesammelte Erzaehlungen, etc. NOTE: This course is conducted in German.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 3102|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 4182. Advanced Independent Study I. 3 Credit Hours.

Supervised reading, research, and reports on an advanced level in German language, literature, and civilization.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

GER 4221. German Culture Through Film. 4 Credit Hours.

This course examines German cinema in the context of its relationship to German culture and history. Because film is an art form of creative expression as well as a vehicle for promoting awareness of social concerns, the course will introduce techniques of viewing, analyzing, and evaluating films as expressions of the contemporary culture. Basing our work on films of historical significance and those by premier directors, the course will explore the beginnings of the film industry, Nazi propaganda, the impact of the Obernhausen Manifesto, New German Film, and issues of gender and politics since the Wende. It includes an additional hour of instruction in German for German Majors and Minors.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

GER 4282. Advanced Independent Study II. 3 Credit Hours.

Supervised reading, research, and reports on an advanced level in German language, literature, and civilization.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

GER 4296. Composition II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course builds on the skills mastered in German 3096 (W231) (Composition I) by fostering more sophisticated use of the language through written practice and study of advanced problems in syntax and style. Use of contemporary materials from German-speaking countries. NOTE: The course is conducted in German.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 3096|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 4301. History of the German Language. 3 Credit Hours.

Origins and development of the German language, including changes in sounds, grammar and vocabulary. NOTE: Taught in English.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites:
GER 1003|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently
OR LCGE EXMPT|May not be taken concurrently.

GER 4940. Honors: Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course requires an advanced level of proficiency in German. Prerequisite is the successful completion of a 2000-level German course, an intensive writing experience, or with instructor approval. The topic will be an advanced study of various literary genres to be selected by the Core-Coordinators, and to be announced before enrollment.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

Pre-requisites:
GER 2000|Minimum Grade of C-|May not be taken concurrently.

I work primarily on early-modern conceptions of the unity of science and the large-scale structure of fields of knowledge. In particular, I am interested in how early-modern conceptions the unity of knowledge were used to justify the authority of philosophy over the physical sciences. This research consists of three overlapping areas: early-modern views regarding the reduction and dependence of branches of knowledge to/on one another, forms of demonstration and deduction in the new early-modern sciences, and the metaphysical underpinnings of those sciences.

When not an academic, I work on web-related projects or code, compile, and generally make a mess with programming languages. My computer concerns mirror my academic concerns: I like thinking about how knowledge is organized in the computer age, and spend way too much time exploring database and information management technologies.

Vanessa Carbonell works at the intersection of ethical theory, metaethics, and moral psychology. She is particularly interested in moral agents (both ordinary and extraordinary) and how they navigate the moral landscape. This has led her to write about moral saints, moral motivation, moral sacrifice, and the relationship between knowledge and moral obligation. She also has research and teaching interests in bioethics and family ethics. For more information, including links to papers, visit Carbonell's personal website. 

Tony Chemero got his Ph.D. in Philosophy and Cognitive Science from Indiana University in 1999.  From then to 2012, he taught at Franklin & Marshall College (F&M), where he was Professor of Psychology.  In 2012, he became Professor of Philosophy and Psychology at the University of Cincinnati. 

Tony’s research is both philosophical and empirical.  It is focused on questions related to dynamical modeling, ecological psychology, artificial life and complex systems. He is author of more than 70 articles and the book Radical Embodied Cognitive Science (2009, MIT Press), which was a finalist for the Lakatos Award.  His second book, co-authored with Stephan Kaufer, will appear on Polity Press.  He is currently editing the second edition of the MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences.

For more infomrmation, see Tony's pages at academia.edu or google scholar

Hardcastle, Valerie Gray

Professor of Philosophy, Psychology, and Psychiatry & Behavioral Neuroscience | Co-Director and Scholar-in-Residence, Weaver Institute for Law and Psychiatry | Director, Medicine, Health, and Society Program | Executive Director, UC LEAF | Affiliated Facu

201-A McMicken Hall

513-556-6334

valerie.hardcastle@uc.edu

An internationally recognized scholar, Valerie is the author of five books and over 150 essays. She studies the nature and structure of interdisciplinary theories in the cognitive sciences and has focused primarily on developing a philosophical framework for understanding conscious phenomena responsive to neuroscientific, psychiatric, and psychological data.  Currently, she is investigating the neuroscience of violence and its implications for both our understanding of human nature and the criminal justice system.  She is also trying to figure out whether notions of embodied cognition help or hinder theorizing about consciousness.

Most recently, Valerie has received research fellowships from the Medical Humanities Program at the University of Texas-Medical Branch, the Center for Mind, Brain, and Cognitive Evolution at Ruhr-University Bochum, and the Institute for Philosophy/School of Advanced Study at the University of London.  She received a bachelor’s degree with a double major in philosophy and political science from the University of California, Berkeley, a master’s degree in philosophy from the University of Houston, and an interdisciplinary PhD in cognitive science and philosophy from the University of California, San Diego.  

Langland-Hassan's research spans the philosophy of mind, the philosophy of psychology, and cognitive science.  Of particular interest to him are cognitive theories of imagination and pretense, the nature of visual imagery and inner speech, and the relation of imagery and imagination to self-knowledge and introspection.  His work has explored the ways in which introspective and imaginative capacities can become disrupted in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.  He was recently involved in an interdisciplinary study investigating the cognitive impact of inner speech deficits in people with aphasia.

Langland-Hassan arrived at UC in 2011 after spending two years as a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology program at Washington University in St. Louis.  He received his Ph.D. in philosophy in 2009 from The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and his B.A. in philosophy from Columbia University in 1997.

More information is available on his personal website:  http://langland-hassan.com

I work on issues in contemporary philosophy of mind, psychology, and cognitive science, for example: what is empathy and what is its moral relevance? how should we understand shame? how do we understand other minds? are psychopaths responsible agents? do you need to know what you are doing in order to be responsible for it? do judgments of right or wrong essentially spring from practical reason or emotion? are women better empathizers than men?

Areas of Specialization

Thomas Polger's research is located at the intersection of contemporary philosophy of mind with metaphysics and philosophy of science. His work is organized around the long-term project of exploring how to understand conscious experience as a natural feature of biological organisms. Among his interests are the metaphysics of experience, the role of evolutionary theory in thinking about minds, the nature of color vision, and the relation between psychological explanations and those in biology and the neurosciences. He is also interested in metaphilosophical issues concerning naturalism and philosophical methodology.

Potochnik's research interests include philosophy of biology, philosophy of science, and history of logical empiricism.  She is especially focused upon the methodology of population biology; the role of idealized models in biology and science more generally; the properties of scientific explanations; how gender and other social factors influence science; and the work of Otto Neurath. 

Visit Potochnik's website.  

Dr. Robert C. Richardson is the Charles Phelps Taft Professor of Philosophy in the McMicken College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Cincinnati. He is a fellow of the AAAS, and a fellow in the Graduate School at the University of Cincinnati. He earned hs B.A. magna cum laude from the University of Colorado (1971) and his M.A. and Ph.D. with homors from the University of Chicago (1977). He has held numerous visiting appointments including, most recently, as Gervinus Fellow at the Universität Osnabrück (2008-2009), as a Mercator professor of Cognititve Science, Universität OsnabrUuck (2005), and Visiting Research Professor in the Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Free university of Amsterdam (1993-94). Professor Richardson is the author of Discovering Complexity: Decomposition and Localization as Strategies in Scientific Research (Princeton 1993) considered a seminal work in the area of philosophy of science and biology, and of Evolutionary Psychology as Maladapted Psychology (MIT 2007). He is the author of over eighty academic articles in the areas of philosophy of science, cognitive science, philosophy of ecology, history of biology (19th century), philosophy of the mind, and the history of psychology. Professor Richardson has received awards and grant support from the National Science Foundation, National Research Council, National Endowment for the Humanitites, and the Hanse Institute for Advanced Study in Delmenhorst, Germany and serves on numerous editorial boards for academic journals and presses. In the near three decades of service to the University of Cincinnati, Professor Richardson has served two terms as Head of the Department of Philosophy, several terms as Director of Graduate Studies, and as a member of the Charles Phelps Taft Faculty Executive Board as well as Taft standing committees.

Robert Skipper received the PhD in Philosophy in 2000 from the Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Maryland, College Park. He came to Cincinnati in 2001-2002.

Skipper's research has focused on the origins and development of evolutionary genetics and particularly the founders of population genetics. He also has interests in general philosophy of science as well as environmental ethics, law, and policy.

During the 2014-2015 academic year, Skipper will be teaching:

PHIL 1000, "Introduction to Philosophy"
PHIL 7062, "Philosophy of Biology"

More information can be found at Skipper's website.

Koffi N. Maglo received his BA degree from the University of Lomé in Togo. After obtaining MA and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Burgundy in France, he did postdoctoral studies at Virginia Tech in the US. He was a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, (2003-5). His interests include philosophy of biology and biomedicine, ethics and population health, philosophy of science, history of 17thand 18thcentury physics, African philosophy.

In the area of philosophy of biology and biomedicine, his work focuses on the ontological and epistemic status of population stratification concepts in genomics and evidence-based medicine, and on theoretical and ethical issues in personalized medicine. He currently leads collaborative interdisciplinary research projects on ethics and obesity research, and on race-based therapy.  He has previously organized in April 2007 an interdisciplinary symposium at the University of Cincinnati on “Race in the Age of Genomic Medicine: The Science and its Applications.” http://www.uc.edu/news/NR.asp?id=5592.

Koffi Maglo published also on the structure and developments of Newtonian mechanics and its reception across European scientific institutions. His publications include essays in recent French philosophy of science and on the French Enlightenment. At a more theoretical level, his research in the history of physics and in the philosophy of biology deals with questions about the reality, validity and utility of scientific notions.

Associate Professor Steven J. Cahn, PhD, is a music theorist and pianist whose research and specialized teaching areas include: 
  • Schoenberg Studies/Twentieth-Century Music Theory
  • Neuroscience/Psychology of Music
  • Aesthetics, Hermeneutics & Theories of History
  • History of Music Theory
  • Musical Form in the 18th and 19th Centuries
  • Cultural Studies & Jewish Music Studies

His work appears in collections—Cambridge Companion to Schoenberg, Schoenberg and Words, Schoenberg: Interpretationen seiner Werke—and journals—Journal of the Arnold Schoenberg Center, Journal of the American Musicological Society, Opera Quarterly, Ostinato rigore. His collaborative research has been published in Cognitive Neuropsychology (DOI: 10.1080/02643294.2011.646972) and the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology (DOI: 10.3766/jaaa.24.1.6).

Cahn has received support from the Tangeman Sacred Music Center, the Dean’s Travel Fund, the National Institutes of Health — Lab for Integrative and Medical Biophysics, the National Endowment for the Humanities (Summer Stipend) and University Research Council, Faculty Research Support Grant. He has presented papers at international conferences including Jewishness and the Arts (Rome, 2015), Schoenberg at 140 (Canterbury, UK, 2014), Symposia of the Arnold Schoenberg Center (Vienna, 2001, 2002) and the Third International Conference on Jewish Music (SOAS, London 2000). In the U.S., he has presented papers at the Getty Center, the Library of Congress and the National Institutes of Health. He has also presented research at the annual meetings of the American Musicological Society, Society for Music Theory, Music Theory Midwest and International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition (ICMPC8). 

An evolutionary paleobiologist and paleoecologist, with research and teaching interests in biodiversity throughout geological time and in the present day. Current projects include the investigation of geographic and environmental selectivity during global mass extinctions and major diversification events; assessment of anthropogenic impacts on shallow-water molluscan communities as recorded in skeletal accumulations; numerical modeling of time-averaged fossil assemblages; and assessments of the distributions of animals and plants along present and past environmental gradients. 

Parr, Adrian

Professor and Director of The Charles Phelps Taft Research Center; Department of Political Science & School of Architecture and Interior Design; UNESCO Water Chair (PhD, Monash University)

1100C EDWARDS 1 Edwards Center

513-556-0675

parran@uc.edu

ADRIAN PARR PH.D

EDUCATION
PhD Monash University (AU) 2002 – Philosophy and Cultural Studies
MA Deakin University (AU) 2000 – Department of Politics & Philosophy
BA (First Class Honors Philosophy) Deakin University (AU) 1998

AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Cultural politics, environmental politics, political philosophy, feminist philosophy, water justice, contemporary continental philosophy.

CURRENT PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS
Professor (Political Science and the School of Architecture and Interior Design)
Director of the Charles Phelps Taft Research Center & Chair of Taft Faculty, University of Cincinnati
Faculty – Environmental Studies, Political Science; Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Philosophy; and Judaic Studies

UNESCO co-chair Water Access and Sustainability

Visiting Professorial Fellow – iCinema, the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

ECBR, Evolutionary ecology: Landscape genomics, migration, speciaiton, adaptation, invasive species, behavior, island systems, "ancient" DNA, vertebrates, Darwin's finches and lizards.

Michael Riley studies human perceptual-motor behavior from the perspectives of complexity science and ecological psychology. He has taught many undergraduate and graduate courses including Research Methods in Perception & Action, History of Psychology, Human Factors, and Control and Coordination of Action. His research is supported by the National Science Foundation.

ECBR, SBBE, Behavioral ecology, arachnology: multi-modal communication and sexual selection in wolf spiders; social behavior in colonial web-building spiders.

Areas of Specialization

John McEvoy works in science studies and political philosophy. He has published extensively on the history and philosophy of science, focusing mainly on the Chemical Revolution, which occurred in the eighteenth century and is generally regarded as the origins of modern chemistry, and twentieth-century interpretations of this important event. He is currently working on more general issues pertaining to the historiography of science and is keen to show how the discipline of the history of science is shaped by wider philosophical and cultural influences. McEvoy also teaches political philosophy, focusing on the classical texts of Marx and Engels and the twentieth-century writings of the Frankfurt School, Foucault, and Althusser. He also teaches courses on the philosophy of technology and the historical and philosophical relations between magic, science, and the occult. His analysis of the 'history of the history of science' since World War Two is available in The Historiography of the Chemical Revolution: Patterns of Interpretation in the History of Science (London: Pickering and Chatto, 2010).

Jenefer Robinson teaches and writes on topics in aesthetics and philosophical psychology, especially the theory of emotion. Her book, Deeper than Reason (OUP 2005) applied recent advances in emotion theory to issues in aesthetics, such as the expression of emotion in the arts, how music arouses emotions and moods, and how the emotional experience of literature and music in particular can be a mode of understanding and appreciation. Jenefer is President of the American Society for Aesthetics. Her presidential address was about the role of emotional feelings in the appreciation of architecture. She is currently writing a book on emotion for OUP.

For more information, please see her personal website

Taught philosophy at UC from fall 1958 to June 1988. Received the Cohen award for Excellence in Teaching and the Barbour Award for Student-Faculty relations. Secretary of the Cincinnati (Delta of Ohio) chapter of Phi Beta Kappa since 1970 something. Secretary of Omicron Delta Kapa honor society for 30 some years. Have taught a class each fall, winter, and spring terms in UC.s Institute for Learning in Retirement since spring 1990. Have volunteered in the A&S Student Affairs office since spring 1988. A 3-miles 3 times a week jogger since fall 1946--not up to today's standards but started long before all these new people started cluttering up the world.

My primary research interest is the philosophy of perception. Specifically, I am interested in enactive approaches to studying the phenomenology and content of perceptual experience. Aside from perception I am interested in aesthetics and the history of philosophy (17th - 20th c.).

I am a Teaching Assistant in the Department of Philosophy. My main interests include the philosophy of mental health, mind, and psychology. 

website: andrew-evans.weebly.com

I examine philosophical questions through the lens of the empirical sciences of the mind. Specifically, I am interested in the extent to which cognitive sciences, neuroscience, and psychology inform debates about things like attention, mental representation, computation, and the role of the brain in cognition.

My current research is an interdisciplinary exploration of the connection between empathy and moral behavior which uses empirical work from psychology and neuroscience to give insight into philosophical ethics.  I argue that many moral failings, from the mundane to the horrific, are the result of a lack of "moral perception", not a lack of moral judgment or motivation, and that some forms of empathy are necessary to develop and improve our moral perception.

I also teach pre-college philosophy (or "philosophy for children") around Cincinnati in elementary schools and high schools.  

My main areas of interest are in the philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Specifically, I am interested in imagination and its relationship to action, emotion, and other folk psychological attitudes. I have secondary interests in ethics and moral psychology.

My field of interest is the philosophy of psychology and cognitive sciences. I'm currently exploring the embodied-ecological approach in cognitive science, aiming to develop a more eclectic understanding of behaviour and cognition. I'm especially interested in explaining how we use reason and understanding to interact with our physical and social environments.

I also nurse a growing interest in philosophy for childen, and generally how philosophy might be used to improve well-being in both individuals and communities.

Ayca Mazman's main areas of interest are philosophy of mind, naturalized epistemology and metaphysics of mind. She is also interested in feminist epistemologies especially Third World feminisms.  

My main areas of interest are Non-Western Comparative Philosophy, Embodied Cognitive Science, and the possibility of interactions between the two. Specifically, I focus on Indian and Japanese Buddhist Philosophy and explore ways to use each in contemporary problems within Ecological Psychology, cognitive science, and environmental ethics. I am currently researching a comparative project involving empathy and a Buddhist notion of practice. 

I do research in the philosophy of mind, psychology, and cognitive science, particularly where these inform theoretical models of mental disorder. My current research focuses on the analogies and disanalogies between mental disorder and bodily illness, and what these can tell about the status of psychiatry as a branch of medical science and the proper boundaries of psychiatric practice.

My main field of interest is cognitive science, its scope, and its interaction with scientific development and new technologies. Currently, I am focused both on ecological psychology and on different approaches to non-human cognition. Concerning ecological psychology, I am interested in concepts such as perceptual information or resonance. Also, I work on the dynamic systems approach to cognitive science. Within the field of non-human cognition I am working on the history and philosophy of cognitive ethology and plant signaling
and behavior.

https://uc.academia.edu/VicenteRaja

Eric S. Rogers is a philosopher of science and an evolutionary biologist. His major areas of interest are the philosophy of biology, general philosophy of science, and epistemology. His recent philosophical work centers on new approaches in the philosophy of science, process and pattern in multi-level selection, and issues pertaining to explanations, methods, and theories in invasion ecology. His biological work centers around historical ecology and principles of biological invasions.

My main research interests are in the history and philosophy of science, philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Within HPS, I have been drawn to philosophical issues arising from model-based reasoning in science, and to the history of conceptual and technological innovations in medicine and psychology. Within mind and cognition, I have been motivated by questions about agency, intentionality, belief and language, and particularly the compatibility of mindreading-based models of social cognition with theories of embodied, situated and extended cognition. Uniting these areas of inquiry, I am interested in how an ecological approach to cognition and reasoning can help make sense of the relationship between scientific and ordinary understanding as well as of the intersection of science and social values.

My main areas of interest are the philosophy of biology, specifically with regards to systematics, paleontology and evolution; as well as the general practice of science and the role of interdisiciplinary research in science. 

Interests focus on the cognition, perception, and metaphysics of artworks (especially film and music), the impact of technology and recording on art forms, trends in 20th Century epistemology and philosophy of science (especially empiricism, pragmatism, and naturalism), the comparative methods of philosophy and science, and visual and auditory perception generally.

I am a philosopher working at the intersection of metaphysics, philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, and epistemology.  The subject of my current research is the concept of emergence as discussed in both the philosophical and scientific literature.  I think that philosophers and complexity scientists alike can benefit by being mutually informed.  My research project is interdisciplinary in nature and seeks to reconceive and clarify the notion of emergence so that it is both precise and useful for understanding metaphysical and scientific theories of emergence.

My primary research interests are in epistemology, philosophy of science, and philosophical methodology.  I am mostly concerned with the notion of philosophical progress and the possibility of producing substantive results through philosophical investigation.

I am also interested in the work of WVO Quine and the history of early analytic philosophy (especially where Frege, Russell, and Carnap are concerned).

Allen, Timothy W.

Social and Political Philosophy, Democratic Theory, Ancient Philosophy, Philosophy of Law, Critical Thinking, Existentialism, Business Ethics

261A McMicken Hall

513-556-6335

My dissertation research is focused upon social cognition in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). I am interested in the similarities and differences in how individuals on the spectrum and typically-developed (TD) individuals engage in social interaction and cognition. I believe that a hybrid account that brings together insights from situated cognition and theory theory is the best approach to understanding the range and variety of social abilities, differences, and disabilities associated with ASD. I also hope to be able to make suggestions for interventions that will help individuals on the spectrum to better interact with TD individuals and that will help TD individuals to better interact with individuals on the spectrum. 

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