How To Start A Global Essay

Essay Prompt:

With the help of “The Censors” by Luisa Valenzuela, interpret the way the essay writer supports one of the themes listed below.

  1. Humans can change regarding the limited society and absence of freedoms;
  2. A person can become personal rival when facing a particular life challenge;
  3. A decision-making process led by emotions can lead to various adverse outcomes;
  4. Author’s personal theme.

Congratulations – it looks like you have received your first thematic essay assignment! A logical question to follow is, “What is a thematic essay?” In this article, the student can find all answers to the questions regarding this type of academic essay writing along with the helpful hints and great topic ideas.

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Once you are done with your reading, another question may show up. In case a student hesitates about his knowledge or skills, it is possible to hire a professional essay writer from the competent online academic essay service.

What Is a Thematic Essay? You Ask – We Answer

The best answer to the question, “What is a thematic essay” would be: an academic writing assignment, which contains a specific response of the writer to the main essay prompt’s question(s) or an analysis of the specific argument. This type of academic essay focuses on concepts in the selected field of study. It goes beyond recall of facts; the essay enhances critical thinking & analytical skills; this essay makes students provide logical links. Even if the essay’s questions seem unrelated, it is important to draw a parallel.

In this type of essay, the teacher expects the student to analyze several factors.

  1. Details
  2. Diction
  3. Imagery
  4. Foreshadowing
  5. Personification
  6. Figurative language
  7. Rhetorical devices

The listed literary devices help the writer to develop the central essay’s theme. They figure as the essay’s evidence collected from credible sources.

Ways to Find the Central Theme of an Essay

In a thematic essay, it may be hard to define the primary question form the first look at the assignment prompt. Use these tips to decide on the central theme of this type of academic essay.
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  1. Make a summary of the used literature: Any source like a book or newspaper provides the necessary hints to define the main idea.
  2. Select the dominating subject to discuss: Pay attention to the difference between a subject and a theme. A theme is a narrower subject as it talks about a specific point from the overall topic. An example of the essay’s subject might be Stephen’s King novel while an essay’s theme would be a bigotry on the example of “Misery.”
  3. Learn to read between the lines: Get deeper into the literary piece to get more clues and examples. They will help to find the answers to essay prompt.
  4. General significance: Can the discussed issue be useful & important in real life?

How to Write a Thematic Essay: Introduction, Conclusion, and Reasons Why Body Paragraphs Come First

The next thing to discuss is how to write a thematic essay. The most challenging task in many academic writing assignments is to highlight/understand/interpret the teacher’s prompt.

How to Write a Thematic Essay for English Literature Class: Analyzing the Prompt

Re-read the instruction carefully several times. Here are the most common tasks a student may face:

  • Discussion – Making observations with the help of facts, statistics, logic, reasoning, & argument (introducing the concept in details).
  • Description – Illustrating the essay’s topic in words using a lot of details.
  • Showing – To make it short, it means “to point out something”; this action is about stating a writer’s side concisely by providing a support/evidence for the author’s words.
  • Explanation – Providing things in a plain, understandable way with the help of reasons & causes. Presenting the logical flow of essay ideas.

Developing a Powerful Thematic Essay Introduction

Professional Essay Writer’s Advice

“It may seem unusual, but in case of a thematic essay, a student should start with the body paragraphs. It is better to omit the introduction until the author decides on the main argument of the essay after underlining the primary questions to answer. Once the writer is done, he should review the body paragraphs to come up with an introduction that reveals the arguments and provides a brief overview of the entire text.”

Professor Samuels, a Literature & Arts tutor and online academic essay writer at NerdyMates

What can we say about thematic essay’s introduction? In general, a thematic essay is nothing more than an outline of the main points. If you want to get a clear answer to the question, “What is a thematic essay,” you should understand some academic essays have more primary points than others. It means a student will need more primary sources. He will need to retrieve multiple supporting arguments to defend the essay.

Not to get lost, take down notes mentioning the essay arguments while writing a draft. After that, decide on a strong thesis statement. It gets complicated as a good thesis statement must be concise (a single-sentence statement), and thematic essay requires a plenty of points. It is necessary to choose the most important idea based on the prompt. Essay thesis example: Student’s essay disagrees that the entry of the US army into WWII finished the country’s policy of isolationism in foreign affairs, and that is how the thesis statement should sound!

In your essay’s body then, put minimum 3 good supporting arguments. A typical essay is made of 5 paragraphs. Each of them should provide a particular reason why the US foreign policy changed dramatically after the World War II compared to the post-War policy.

Try to engage the reader’s interests and provide him with a roadmap! Do not forget to add quotations to your essay – find how to cite the sources properly in this article!

Working on Memorable Thematic Essay Conclusion

As the main goal of a thematic essay prompt is to make the student respond to the specific questions, so give your answer at the end! Add a summary of the essay’s topic. Paraphrase the main point, essay’s thesis statement, share the findings and sum up how the included information helped to prove the author’s opinion.

Important! It is necessary to extend an essay’s argument. A sophisticated essay conclusion should not paraphrase the thesis alone – make an attempt to offer the broader meaning of the question by explaining why it is significant.

There are more things to explore to answer, “What is a thematic essay?” For instance, pay attention to the list of global regents thematic essay topics and other topic ideas shared by the top students from the best colleges in the US and the UK!

Thematic Essay: DOs & DON’Ts!

To learn how to write a thematic essay, it is critical to pay attention to the grading rubric. Here is what a student should do to get A:

  • Present a concise, clear knowledge;
  • Address all the assigned questions;
  • Perform a deep analysis of the subjects/events/people;
  • Write a cogent thematic essay, rich for the details;
  • Prepare a summary of the basic arguments;
  • Develop powerful introduction and conclusion.

What about the bad ideas? In case a student lacks the depth/accuracy, provides faulty evaluation, misses any question, ignores the examples, writes weak introduction/conclusion, or fails to cite the sources properly, he/she risks obtaining an F. try to keep away from other academic writing mistakes after reading this article.

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30 Thematic Essay Topics to Satisfy Student’s Curiosity

Are you ready to observe the list of the most interesting thematic essay topics? The article has several separate categories of such ideas: US history thematic essay, global regents thematic essay topics, and belief systems thematic essay. This way, it will be easier to choose what a student needs.

Belief Systems Thematic Essay

  1. Determine the God in Christianity
  2. Identify the founding father of Hinduism
  3. Define a significant manual or book used as the main holy text of the chosen religion
  4. Find out how many followers Islam has nowadays
  5. Discover the ways a certain religious movement spreads its dogmas into the world
  6. Define the role of certain religious movement's leaders in the cultural development of the nations
  7. Decide on and provide the details on the significant construction of the particular religion
  8. List the goals of the Buddhism along with its main life lessons
  9. Identify the wisdom shared by the Christianity followers
  10. Discuss three or more basic teachings of Judaism

Global Regents Thematic Essay Topics

  1. Decide on a couple of natural resources. Explain why people need them and how these resources influence entire population
  2. Choose a country that supports imperialism. Provide an in-depth overview of the reasons why these people chose to follow this specific regime and explain the ways imperialism impacted the conquerors
  3. Pick a couple of geographic conditions and show their effect on the particular region & its development
  4. Interpret the ways some of the best ideas evolved over time
  5. Discuss how a particular political movement affected people living in a certain country
  6. Focus on the life and activity of 2 known philosophers and explain their roles in the development of modern philosophical trends
  7. Talk about 3 people who decided to challenge the religion in a particular country. Explain their fate in details
  8. Discuss several historical leaders who led to positive changes
  9. Focus on explaining the consequences and outcomes of some famous wars
  10. Revolutions of student’s choice: development, ending, and results

US History Thematic Essay

  1. Identify the causes and outcomes of the Great Depression
  2. Identify the reasons for and consequences of the Civil War in the United States
  3. Define the causes & results of the Korean War
  4. Point to the impact of social media on the modern US history
  5. 2 foreign policies run by the United States: Describe them in details
  6. Assess the success of 1820-1933 reforms in the US
  7. Analyze the causes and consequences of the migrations within the United States
  8. Identify the reasons why Europeans destroyed Indian population
  9. Choose a couple of trade agreements that were controversial. Mention why they were supported/rejected by the government
  10. Choose a couple of areas that belong to the United States. Explain the ways this country conquered or enslaved those territories

Wow, such an inspiring list of thematic essay topics, isn’t it? We are not saying they are the best and only options in the world. A student can always look for other exciting ideas, read free essay examples, use the ideas of famous authors, and do other things to increase this list of possible topics. What is a choice of topic is not a problem, and you need some writing help? The simplest and most reasonable way to submit an A+ thematic essay on any topic is to purchase custom college essays offered by the leading US/UK essay writing service! Its prices are democratic, and the results are above any expectations!

As the government begins its crackdown on essay mill websites, it’s easy to see just how much pressure students are under to get top grades for their coursework these days. But writing a high-scoring paper doesn’t need to be complicated. We spoke to experts to get some simple techniques that will raise your writing game.

Tim Squirrell is a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh, and is teaching for the first time this year. When he was asked to deliver sessions on the art of essay-writing, he decided to publish a comprehensive (and brilliant) blog on the topic, offering wisdom gleaned from turning out two or three essays a week for his own undergraduate degree.

“There is a knack to it,” he says. “It took me until my second or third year at Cambridge to work it out. No one tells you how to put together an argument and push yourself from a 60 to a 70, but once you to get grips with how you’re meant to construct them, it’s simple.”

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Poke holes

The goal of writing any essay is to show that you can think critically about the material at hand (whatever it may be). This means going beyond regurgitating what you’ve read; if you’re just repeating other people’s arguments, you’re never going to trouble the upper end of the marking scale.

“You need to be using your higher cognitive abilities,” says Bryan Greetham, author of the bestselling How to Write Better Essays. “You’re not just showing understanding and recall, but analysing and synthesising ideas from different sources, then critically evaluating them. That’s where the marks lie.”

But what does critical evaluation actually look like? According to Squirrell, it’s simple: you need to “poke holes” in the texts you’re exploring and work out the ways in which “the authors aren’t perfect”.

“That can be an intimidating idea,” he says. “You’re reading something that someone has probably spent their career studying, so how can you, as an undergraduate, critique it?

“The answer is that you’re not going to discover some gaping flaw in Foucault’s History of Sexuality Volume 3, but you are going to be able to say: ‘There are issues with these certain accounts, here is how you might resolve those’. That’s the difference between a 60-something essay and a 70-something essay.”

Critique your own arguments

Once you’ve cast a critical eye over the texts, you should turn it back on your own arguments. This may feel like going against the grain of what you’ve learned about writing academic essays, but it’s the key to drawing out developed points.

“We’re taught at an early age to present both sides of the argument,” Squirrell continues. “Then you get to university and you’re told to present one side of the argument and sustain it throughout the piece. But that’s not quite it: you need to figure out what the strongest objections to your own argument would be. Write them and try to respond to them, so you become aware of flaws in your reasoning. Every argument has its limits and if you can try and explore those, the markers will often reward that.”

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Fine, use Wikipedia then

The use of Wikipedia for research is a controversial topic among academics, with many advising their students to stay away from the site altogether.

“I genuinely disagree,” says Squirrell. “Those on the other side say that you can’t know who has written it, what they had in mind, what their biases are. But if you’re just trying to get a handle on a subject, or you want to find a scattering of secondary sources, it can be quite useful. I would only recommend it as either a primer or a last resort, but it does have its place.”

Focus your reading

Reading lists can be a hindrance as well as a help. They should be your first port of call for guidance, but they aren’t to-do lists. A book may be listed, but that doesn’t mean you need to absorb the whole thing.

Squirrell advises reading the introduction and conclusion and a relevant chapter but no more. “Otherwise you won’t actually get anything out of it because you’re trying to plough your way through a 300-page monograph,” he says.

You also need to store the information you’re gathering in a helpful, systematic way. Bryan Greetham recommends a digital update of his old-school “project box” approach.

“I have a box to catch all of those small things – a figure, a quotation, something interesting someone says – I’ll write them down and put them in the box so I don’t lose them. Then when I come to write, I have all of my material.”

There are a plenty of online offerings to help with this, such as the project management app Scrivener and referencing tool Zotero, and, for the procrastinators, there are productivity programmes like Self Control, which allow users to block certain websites from their computers for a set period.

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Look beyond the reading list

“This is comparatively easy to do,” says Squirrell. “Look at the citations used in the text, put them in Google Scholar, read the abstracts and decide whether they’re worth reading. Then you can look on Google Scholar at other papers that have cited the work you’re writing about – some of those will be useful. But quality matters more than quantity.”

And finally, the introduction

The old trick of dealing with your introduction last is common knowledge, but it seems few have really mastered the art of writing an effective opener.

“Introductions are the easiest things in the world to get right and nobody does it properly,” Squirrel says. “It should be ‘Here is the argument I am going to make, I am going to substantiate this with three or four strands of argumentation, drawing upon these theorists, who say these things, and I will conclude with some thoughts on this area and how it might clarify our understanding of this phenomenon.’ You should be able to encapsulate it in 100 words or so. That’s literally it.”

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